Postdoc opening in Paris, Schmidt-Hieber lab

Christoph Schmidt-Hieber’s new lab at the Pasteur in Paris will open later this year and he has an opening for a postdoc to study neural circuits for navigation and memory. Labrigger has covered Christoph’s open source work before, on mouse VR and electrophysiology. Here is a link to that part of his web page.

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SpikeGadgets extracellular recording and open source software

SpikeGadgets makes hardware and software for extracellular array recording. They make nice looking hardware, both for recording from arrays, and for controlling experiments. They sell a few accessories as well, including this commutator. Their software is open source. MATLAB and Python code is also part of the project. The company’s run by Mattias Karlsson (worked

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Uniqb – construction system

Tibbo, whose microcontrollers were just mentioned here, also sells a construction system called Uniqb. It’s a bit like MakerBeam (it and another system, OpenBeam, are available on Amazon). Store Blog

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Tibbo Project System – modular microcontroller

Tibbo makes modular microcontrollers, with plug-in modules for I/O ports (e.g. DB9), relays, sensors, digitizers, etc. They have different sizes, the largest of which is available as a Linux version.

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Ripple noise on PMTs in 2-photon imaging – Part 2

The recent post on ripple noise generated some comments and additional discussion. Go check out the comments on that post. For example, Peter Rupprecht shared some snapshots an oscilloscope display showing the signal from the BNC connector at the back of the laser, in the presence of this ripple noise. The ripple is seen when

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Ripple noise on PMTs in 2-photon imaging

Andrew Lim wrote in to discuss strategies on dealing with ripple noise in 2-photon imaging systems, particularly when using resonant scanners. He writes: This isn’t so much a tip as a problem with resonant two-photon scopes that several people have told me they also have but I haven’t seen a solution for (other people apparently

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Postdoc position with Duguid in Edinburgh

A world-class in vivo patch clamp electrophysiologist, Ian Duguid, is recruiting to his lab. Ian provides excellent training, and his lab is in a tremendous setting: Edinburgh. Ian’s also one of the current leaders of the famous CSHL Ion Channels course. By the way, his web site also has some interesting machine drawings and other

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Sanworks’ open source behavior devices and pulse generator

Sanworks has a whole series of devices for behavior experiments. Everything is open source and well documented. You can also pay them to assemble the devices if you choose. They have also created a pulse generator called the PulsePal, and Arduino Due-powered device offering 2 trigger channels and 4 output channels (minimum pulse width 100

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iPad/iPhone/iOS app RayLab for optical design

RayLab is an iOS app (iPhone/iPad) for optics analysis. It has some nice features– more than I expected. It’s a nice piece of work! For many practical applications it cannot replace conventional optic design software (e.g., Zemax/OSLO/CodeV). That said, it’s a very interesting product and worth checking out. It also does ACBD matrix analysis. Here

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3D printed fly holder

Peter Weir has a nice write up and directions on how to make the fly holder from his recent paper. He has some other useful notes that are worth checking out too: github, blog, web page. Hat tip to John Tuthill (link)

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Open source pipetting robot – aBioBot

aBioBot is an open source liquid handling (i.e., pipetting) robot platform with integrated machine vision. The system can deal with multiple tube types, and detect if a tip falls off. It also has an extensive web-based protocol authoring and monitoring software package.

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ViRMEn – Virtual reality MATLAB engine

Dmitriy Aronov, while postdocing in David Tank’s lab at Princeton, developed a virtual reality engine that runs in MATLAB called ViRMEn. It’s open and there’s a good amount of documentation. The downloadable versions date back to 2013, and it is regularly updated. The most recent update as of the writing of this blog post was

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Slack software for labs

Slack is very useful team coordination software. It’s been such a help in my own lab, that I suspect that given a properly configured Slack account, I could simultaneously run GE, Google, Intel, and the US Federal Government. It’s easy to dismiss Slack. To a large extent, it’s basically a bunch of chat rooms. I

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Orange is open software for data exploration

Orange is a user friendly, graphical data mining package built with Python, from the University of Ljubljana. Check it out. They have a good blog for the project too.

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Meeting in Belgium on Read-Modify-Write Neural Circuitry

Neuro-Electronics Research Flanders is having its annual Neurotechnology Symposium May 2nd and 3rd, 2016 in Leuven, Belgium. This year the focus is on “Read- Modify- Write” technologies for interfacing with neural circuits. Confirmed Speakers: Dora Angelaki, Baylor College of Medicine, U.S.A. Polina Anikeeva, MIT, U.S.A. Antal Berényi, University of Szeged, Hungary Megan R. Carey, Champalimaud

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